Learning 2.0

Soutenance de thèse de doctorat – 14 octobre 2010, 9h, Campus Walfer

Anne MEYER soutiendra sa thèse de doctorat, ayant comme titre “Peer interactions in the language classroom: Expert-novice-practices in learning activities at primary school” le 14 octobre 2010, à 9h à l’Université du Luxembourg (Campus Walferdange, salle INSIDE, Bat. XII) en présence des professeurs Dr. Ed Elbers (Utrecht University), Dr. Charles Max (Université du Luxembourg, président du jury), Dr. Marie-Thérèse Vasseur (Université du Maine), Dr. Steve Walsh (Newcastle University) et Dr. Gudrun Ziegler (Université du Luxembourg, directrice de thèse).

Participation libre d’accès, prière de se présenter à la salle indiquée 10 minutes avant le début de la séance.

Abstract:

Meyer, Anne (2010): Peer interactions in the language classroom: Expert-novice-practices in learning activities at primary school

The present research focuses on peer interactions engaged with the accomplishment of learning activities in the primary classroom. Driven by the need to understand learning taking place in peer group-s, the research draws on audio and video data stemming from the primary classroom in Luxembourg. The study aims at 1) describing and analyzing the interactional organization of learning activities, 2) describing and analyzing the resources and methods, i.e. expert-novice-practices mobilized by young learners when orienting to the accomplishment of a learning activity, and 3) describing the opportunities for learning. Peer interaction is depicted as one form of a community of practice within which learning is situated and observable as learners in and through the deployment of expert-novice-practices orient to, and adapt to micro-shifts in the participation framework when accomplishing a learning activity. Results point to the fact that not only are expert-novice-practices deployed when young learners work in interaction, but these practices are also found to be inextricably linked to the constitution of expert-novice identities. These findings are discussed with regard to implications for the primary classroom in Luxembourg.

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